25 year-old Illustrator

Clients: Janelle Monáe, National Geographic, Childish Gambino, Angry Birds,
Game Informer, Tomb Raider, EMI Records, Warner Music, FX Network and more.

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Illustration by www.samspratt.com Illustration by www.samspratt.com

"Daenerys" - Illustration by samspratt

Finally finished. Had a little too much fun painting all that loose, whispy, wooshy, hair. Now right back to the art cave to continue research on a poster I’m particularly excited about.

Illustration by www.samspratt.com Illustration by www.samspratt.com

"Daenerys" - Illustration by samspratt

Finally finished. Had a little too much fun painting all that loose, whispy, wooshy, hair. Now right back to the art cave to continue research on a poster I’m particularly excited about.

Alllllmost done.

Sketch in progress of that dragon lady from that show a few people like.

More progress on my painting of Neil deGrasse Tyson.

Hello Sam, How well do you like tumblr compared to other blog sites? I have been mainly using tumblr as a resource of inspiration and some of my own work, but I have a blogspot that I mainly showcases just my work. I feel like I have been pulled between two worlds. Blogspot doesn't seem to have the same publicity as Tumblr... and tumblr feels like it is no better than deviantart as a popularity contest. Which do you recommend for a focus? Should I make another portfolio/blog with just my work?

avidistic

Every platform has strengths and weaknesses, but tumblr is 2 things that make it (in my opinion) the best site for artwork as a whole: 1: It’s image-centric. While it does video, text, and audio, the easiest thing to see and post are images (well, and gifs but I still have no idea how to make those which is both embarrassing and makes me feel very old) and 2: It’s extremely interconnected in how things are shared from the basic reblogging, liking, and following, to deeper connections through tags, fandoms, art submission and curation tumblrs like eatsleepdraw or supersonic, it’s not exclusive to just art like deviant art (so there’s more people to expose it to), and also unlike say: Facebook, there’s no algorithm that hides your work from a large portion of your followers unless you sponsor a post. 

It’s not a flawless platform — it has some pretty hostile sub-cultures, rampant unchecked misinformation (watch out for processed chicken nuggets and Onion headlines taken out of context), and maybe ever so slightly too much idolizing of certain male actors in their late 30s and early 40s — but as a whole when it comes to sharing art, I think it’s pretty great — it’s where I see most of the art I enjoy.

A few artists or curation sites worth checking out here: alicexz, Owen Freeman, Sterling Hundley, Frogman, Fer1972, SuperSonicElectronic, Euclase, David Kassan, and a shit ton more, but those come to mind immediately.

You're an extremely talented artist that could represent anything. Why do you choose to depict celebrities and iconic figures? I believe your artwork could have so much more merit and can contribute much more to society then just entertainment. You even have your symbol as the golden spiral, which I find rather smug for an artist who creates "fan art". I don't intend to offend, it just greatly bothers me to see such a talented artist create advertisement and I would like to know why.

Anonymous

Oh boy.

"Smug" is arbitrarily thinking that one entire genre of art is less than another. 

"Smug" is anonymous back-handed compliments that insult an entire group of artists while trying to police what I choose to make.

"Smug" is thinking that you bestow merit to art and decide its value or contribution to society — or that it needs to do that to begin with.

"Smug" is believing that advertisements are something that automatically lessens art when some of the best painters and works throughout art history, from Leonardo to Caravaggio to Rockwell and Leyendecker have worked in advertising for clients (churches included).

"Smug" is looking at my portfolio of hundreds of paintings over 3 years that cover dozens of genres, styles, subject matters, clients, and sits everywhere from the internet, to billboards, album covers, magazine covers, galleries, newspapers, movie posters, bus-sides, books, homes of friends, strangers, and celebrities, and still choosing to think that I am one thing — a thing that is just as valuable to me as everything I’m paid for professionally.

"Smug" is being a smug dicklet and throwing in “I don’t intend to offend” to cushion the smug dickletishness of it all.

"Smug" is not seeing a simplistic connection between realism in painting and the golden rule that is genre-irrelevant, but again insulting an entire group of artists while commenting on something you haven’t bothered to understand. 

But most of all, “Smug” is thinking that I, or any artist, owes you anything. We can make whatever we want, however we want to. I will keep making advertisements, I will keep making album covers, I will keep making posters for games and movies, I will keep making all that I’m hired to do and choose to take on, but I will also keep making fan art because despite the merit or value that you’ve decided it has — I want to — and that’s all the reason I need.

Take your soggy waffle compliments and fuck the fuck off. Viva la fan art.

Totally in love with COSMOS. New sketch in progress of Neil deGrasse Tyson.

Thanks to all the SCAD people who stopped by to listen to my shtick.

You were all mega nice, recognized a couple of you, and the student work from those who stayed behind was just incredible. I’ll be at Forsyth park tomorrow at 2pm by the main stage thing and anyone is welcome to come on by.

Here’s my partial savannah schedule, anyone is welcome to stop by and say hi. At hayman hall (SCAD illustration building) on Monday I’ll be doing a casual q&a and sticking around for a bit to chat. Off to grab a cup of coffee.

Back in Savannah.

I’ve begun upgrading www.samspratt.com with the help of the awesome Jonathan Black. There’s an updated portfolio and client list, added in a FAQ, Press page, Contact form, Gear list of some of the equipment I use or recommend, added more ways to connect to my other sites, the gallery is now more swipe-y and will soon have larger resolution images, and a few other odds and ends added or tweaked. Take a look.

My little brother engraved this for me into a slab of Oak. So stoked.

I know a girl who went to art school in Georgia, only to drop out because "her teachers were too mean to her" when they would critique her work. Do you think that is sincerely the case, or is it more likely that she did not have the work ethic?

Anonymous

I think many aspects of the way people live and interact with one another are too harsh, too cruel, and unnecessarily nasty — but education (especially art education) is an area that if anything, should be harder. It should coddle less, be honest more, and build an environment that invites criticism as a building tool, not something that can be too “mean”. The purpose of an education is to learn and improve — but I found in my experience at art school — that most students, myself included at times — treated it as a place to express angst or most commonly: just not give a shit about anything. Giving up was a widespread mentality among people who weren’t willing to improve.

Don’t get me wrong, there are awful teachers with god-complexes who are just a brigade of dicks for the sake of it and do not care about building you up through breaking you down in a productive manner — but I still believe that this shouldn’t be cause for quitting school. Education shouldn’t coddle you, it should depict harsh reality in a space where the consequences aren’t as severe as losing a contract or getting fired. There are dick brigades in the real world, awful clients, awful bosses, irrational criticism, malicious criticism, people who will knock down your ideas, shit on your dreams, and education at its best should steel you for how to handle and work through that. I believe it’s better to ready you for the imperfect world and the imperfect people that fill it — than for how it ideally should be. 

“After” - Portrait Contest Winner Illustration by Sam Spratt
So first, thanks again to everyone who entered my portrait contest, they’re always fun for me to make. Rob, who won the whole shebang, gave me a few vague ideas to get inspired by, and let the rest unfold. He liked aspects of The Grey, and desolate, almost post-apolcalyptic in aesthetic environments — the minimal colors, extreme lighting, and graphic look of 300, and from his FB interests I noted a lot of top notch cinematic movies and TV shows like True Detective and Memento so wanted the pose and composition to give a more in-motion vibe than I usually am keen on. I sketched out a new pose from the references given, used myself and a shirt as a lighting reference, created a vague refinery scene, added small details from cuts and bruises to his girlfriend’s name carved into the butt of the rifle on his back, and began painting.  Thanks for being an awesome subject matter with a hell of a beard, Rob. 
To everyone else, I’ll be sure to do this again, and you can of course always snag a print of many of my other works: HERE

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